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How You Can Improve Your Workouts With the Rate of Perceived Readiness Scale

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How You Can Improve Your Workouts With the Rate of Perceived Readiness Scale

How You Can Improve Your Workouts With the Rate of Perceived Readiness Scale

Updated: November 21, 2016

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You're serious about your gains, right? You hit the gym five times a week, follow a detailed program, set and achieve goals, keep a thorough training log and all that good stuff, right?

But sometimes you feel like you're treading water, just fighting to stay afloat. You aren't making true progress, and it is infuriating. It's a terrible feeling, but there is a way to bust through it without changing programs, taking new supplements or making more drastic changes.

Something that I've been doing for the better part of the last year is recording my Rate of Perceived Readiness (RPR) every day in my training log.

RELATED: The Benefits of a Training Log

Coming off a back injury that required a lot of treatment, I started this as an unofficial way to see if I was getting "better" over time. It eventually turned into a monumental breakthrough for my training and something that, little by little, I have recently begun to pass on to my clients.

I'm sure many coaches either do this or have a similar protocol, though they might call it something else. Trust me, I didn't invent this. All industries use readiness reporting in some capacity, but this is just my method, and I believe you can benefit from it.

Here's what to do:

Every day that you train, write your RPR in your training log. Your RPR is measured on a scale of 1 to 10. One is the worst.

One means you should be in bed right now instead of the gym. One means pretty much nothing positive can happen if you decide to work out—it's that bad.

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